Great(ech)ness

4 May 2017 / Mihai Ivascu

As a tech entrepreneur visiting Google and discussing with key people who helped the company in the last years to materialize its vision in over 100 global successful projects, you’re facing two strong feelings. First, determination and strong focus to grow your projects and develop a sustainable business model. Second, amazement triggered by the excellence of executing such a great and complex plan.

At that level, nothing comes by accident and success is the result of a strategic vision completed by flawless execution. The fact that Gmail was invented by a mid-level engineer in its free time may seem an exception somehow associated with luck. The truth is that Google’s executives implemented the 20% strategy, meaning that employees spend 80% of their time on the job and can choose to allocate the remaining 20% to a side project for which the company offers all the needed resources in order to shape it. Clearly, innovation is the key word in every healthy tech company.

Healthy from the inside out, social impact companies aimed at creating shared value, not evil profits. Supporting the bright minds, empowering them and offering a framework in which they can be motivated to push new boundaries is part of the corporate culture excellence. Change is part of the evolution, not a piece of weakness. You understand that by reading about Google, but you feel it too from ‘eating and breathing’ with the pioneers of disruption.

All my respect for the initial founders and investors of Google because it has become a social norm. It’s a state of mind fueled by the desire to innovate, disrupt and push new boundaries by bright minds that share the ‘googly’ mindset. It’s a network of 150.000 members, with 300 joining the ‘movement’ daily. Google is writing the books of performance, consistency and corporate culture. A company that grew from a garage to netting $26 bln per quarter, valued at much more than the GDP of many of the European countries, but ran based on meritocracy and values, not value.


The Sensitive Tech

3 May 2017 / Lorena Menghia

The clearest way to understand the emotional level involved in developing a global tech company is by spending time with the core team behind every social impact project. These were some great days spent at the Google HQ in Palo Alto which revealed a fantastic corporate culture, build around collaboration, innovation and teamwork.

Another company that got it right. Another story in which women empowerment is part of the success story. As a woman tech entrepreneur I can’t be more proud to attend a Machine Learning executive course presented by a brilliant woman engineer, Kshipra Bhawalkar and a course ran at the Google Garage about customer engagement and creative skills for innovation lectured by Elisabeta Moraru.

Female empowerment is part of Google’s core values, an important layer added to the 1998 startup that became a global power.

Empowering women in tech is one of the best things an executive team can do. Because tech, as cold as it seems, its about emotions, strong feelings and art. It’s not mechanics, it’s sensitive tech.